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Join Andréa Tyniec’s musical and meditative journey exploring forgiveness as an active and vibrant daily practice. Her artistic and spiritual investigation is based on Desmond Tutu’s The Book of Forgiving, in which he presents a surprisingly accessible and oh so wise and compassionate fourfold path for healing ourselves and our world. Andréa will be playing solo violin works by J.S. Bach, E. Ysaÿe and Canadian composer Ana Sokolović. Immerse your cells and heart in the depth of her sound and passion as well as Desmond Tutu’s generous guidance and inspiration.

Sat, 26 November 2016
7:30 PM – 8:45 PM

Eight Branches Academy of Eastern Medicine
358 Dupont St.
Toronto, ON

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“I love good music, and I love good interpretations. Do you know what I mean? Performances and performers that take risks, that make your world turn on itself because they changed the colour of one note.”
— Andréa Tyniec


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Violinist Andréa Tyniec has created a versatile performance career as a soloist and as a collaborator with dance and theatre; and is recognized as a promoter of contemporary music, particularly of Canadian new works.  Acclaimed for her “exceptional musicality and intensity” (La Presse), she has performed as a soloist internationally and across Canada with orchestras such as the Niagara Symphony led by Bradley Thatchuk, l’Orchestre de la Francophonie Canadienne led by Jean-Philippe Tremblay, l’Orchestre Métropolitain de Montréal led by Yannick Nézet-Séguin, the Calgary Symphony led by Eric Paetkau, the Münchener Kammerorchester (Germany), I Virtuosi Italiani (Italy), and the Akbank Chamber Orchestra led my Cem Mansur (Turkey). Andréa premiered and recorded André Ristic’s violin Concerto with the Ensemble Contemporain de Montréal+, led by Véronique Lacroix (ATMA), and toured Canada with the ECM+ to premiere Alec Hall’s violin concerto.

Andréa released her “simply stunning” (Wholenote) recording of the Six Sonatas for Solo Violin by Eugène Ysaÿe in 2015. She plays on the Baumgartner Stradivari (1689), a loan by the Musical Instrument Bank of the Canada Council for the arts.

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